August 16, 2014

america-wakiewakie:

peacecorps:

Do you have agriculture and environment skills? Put them to work in Zambia! Apply by 8/30/14 to depart in January 2015 for these positions:

Linking Income, Food, and Environment Volunteer

Rural Aquaculture Promotion Volunteer

Agriculture Extension Volunteer

White savior complex. White savior complex. White savior complex.

May 30, 2014

djgoodblood:

The Dance Hall - A-Z of African Dances

Many dances missing but still a great video!

May 26, 2014

wannatakeawalkonthewildside said: are there more blacks in royalty other then Charlotte and dido Elizabeth belle?

medievalpoc:

um

African History from the Dawn of Time

The Kingdom of Ghana

The History of Tunisia (Carthage)

Black Roman Emperor Septimus Severus

List of 50 especially great Black Kings and Queens

Andromeda

Racism and the Rediscovery of Ancient Nubia (“Kush”, from the Christian Bible)

The Kilwa Sultanate of Tanzania

Most of the Egyptian Royalty of ever

All of the rulers from the History of what is now Nigeria

oh and

EGYPT:

Ancient Egypt:

Hellenic Epoch / Ptolemaic Dynasty

Islamic Egypt:

EAST AFRICA

Nubia / Sudan:

Ethiopia:

Zanzibar:

Omani Sultans of Zanzibar

NORTH AFRICA

Algeria:

Libya:

Mauritania:

Morocco:

Tunisia:

Modern Tunisia

WEST AFRICA

Benin:

Ghana:

Mali:

Niger:

Nigeria:

CENTRAL & SOUTH AFRICA

Angola:

Modern Angola

Central Africa:

Chad:

Lesotho:

South Africa:

 Madagascar:

May 19, 2014
Someone hold me back

God Loves Uganda - Independant Lens: http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/god-loves-uganda/

I’ve watched a lot of documentaries about misguided white missionaries who are convinced their way is the right way. None of them have made me so angry to the point that I actually had to leave the room as this one has. 

I’m still in an emotionally compromised states half an hour after watching it. 

May 13, 2014

iluvsouthernafrica:

As a Black South African (by way of Lesotho) I still find it hard to align myself with the whole “forgive” sentiment as the majority of White South Africans have never really acknowledged what it is we must forgive them for.  We literally went from being teargassed on a daily basis to being told we must forgive immediately or the country will burn down.  

Most Black South Africans I know never sought retribution or violence, we were war weary.  Instead we looked forward to the solid application of policies which would rectify the gross imbalances set up and nurtured by apartheid at our expense.  However, what seemed most urgent at the end of apartheid was reassuring White South Africans (many of whom were fleeing to Australia and England anyway) that they would not only be safe from physical harm, but that their economic stronghold would remain intact.  The idea of a Rainbow nation was primarily set up for that and for providing the world an immaculate image, not for us. 

Today, not only has the ANC continued to let people down, the prevailing and accepted identity is that we have moved on, are a miracle nation where race is not an issue.  I abhor the term “Born Frees” as it implies that anyone born post apartheid has been privy to the same opportunities as the next person.  This reality cannot exist alongside a reality that has been shoved down Black people’s throats that change takes time.    One may be born “Apartheid laws free”, but the deeply ingrained legacy of apartheid will take many years to undo.  At the rate we have gone in the last 20 years, I foresee possibly another 20 years with the same results.  I love South Africa to death but there is a lot of spoil under the sugar coated gloss.  

(via thefemaletyrant)

May 11, 2014
http://lagos2bahia.tumblr.com/post/85464664737/lagos2bahia-i-dont-really-know-how-to

lagos2bahia:

I don’t really know how to articulate this well, but I am incredibly uncomfortable with the way people have been applying western race relations (if you catch my drift) to Nigeria’s current situation. I’ve seen people say that #BringBackOurGirls is not just about Nigerians, it’s…

May 11, 2014
Nigeria kidnapping: why Boko Haram is a top security priority for the US

atane:

This is why many of us are weary of western intervention. It’s never altruistic. We know it comes at a price. I’d love to be optimistic about help, but to be that way, I’d also have to be ahistorical. I am not.

Read the full article.

(via thisisnotindia)

May 11, 2014
descentintotyranny:

Western intervention will turn Nigeria into an African Afghanistan 
The plight of kidnapped girls is set against the corruption and inequality that the west’s economic war has helped to create
May 6 2014
It seems almost beyond belief that more than 200 girls can be kidnapped from a school in northern Nigeria, held by the terrorist group Boko Haram, and threatened on a video – shown worldwide – with being sold into slavery by their captors. The disbelief is compounded by today’s news that, overnight, eight more girls have been kidnapped by suspected Boko Haram gunmen in north-east Nigeria. This tragedy touches the hearts of everyone, evoking a feeling of revulsion not only at the danger and loss of freedom itself, but at the assumption that for young girls their destination must be forced marriage and servitude, not education.
There is rightly anger that so little has been done by the Nigerian government to find the girls, and that those who have demonstrated in huge numbers against President Goodluck Jonathan have themselves been accused of causing trouble or even temporarily arrested.
But we should be wary of the narrative now emerging. This follows a wearily familiar pattern, one we have already seen in south Asia and the Middle East, but that is increasingly being applied to Africa as well.
It is the refrain that something must be done and that “we” – the enlightened west – must be the people to do it. As the US senator Amy Klobuchar put it: “This is one of those times when our action or inaction will be felt not just by those schoolgirls being held captive and their families waiting in agony, but by victims and perpetrators of trafficking around the world. Now is the time to act.”
The call has been for western intervention to help find the girls, and to help “stabilise” Nigeria in the aftermath of their kidnap. The British government has offered “practical help”.
Yet western intervention has time and again failed to deal with particular problems and – worse – has led to more deaths, displacements and atrocities than were originally faced. All too often it has been justified with reference to women’s rights, claiming that enlightened military forces can create an atmosphere where women are free from violence and abuse. The evidence is that the opposite is the case.
Women’s rights were a major justification for the Afghanistan war, launched in 2001, when Cherie Blair and Laura Bush supported their husbands’ war as a means of liberating Afghan women. Today, with millions displaced and tens of thousands dead, Afghanistan remains one of the worst countries on earth for women to live, with forced marriage, child marriage, rape and other atrocities still occurring widely.
Read More

descentintotyranny:

Western intervention will turn Nigeria into an African Afghanistan

The plight of kidnapped girls is set against the corruption and inequality that the west’s economic war has helped to create

May 6 2014

It seems almost beyond belief that more than 200 girls can be kidnapped from a school in northern Nigeria, held by the terrorist group Boko Haram, and threatened on a video – shown worldwide – with being sold into slavery by their captors. The disbelief is compounded by today’s news that, overnight, eight more girls have been kidnapped by suspected Boko Haram gunmen in north-east Nigeria. This tragedy touches the hearts of everyone, evoking a feeling of revulsion not only at the danger and loss of freedom itself, but at the assumption that for young girls their destination must be forced marriage and servitude, not education.

There is rightly anger that so little has been done by the Nigerian government to find the girls, and that those who have demonstrated in huge numbers against President Goodluck Jonathan have themselves been accused of causing trouble or even temporarily arrested.

But we should be wary of the narrative now emerging. This follows a wearily familiar pattern, one we have already seen in south Asia and the Middle East, but that is increasingly being applied to Africa as well.

It is the refrain that something must be done and that “we” – the enlightened west – must be the people to do it. As the US senator Amy Klobuchar put it: “This is one of those times when our action or inaction will be felt not just by those schoolgirls being held captive and their families waiting in agony, but by victims and perpetrators of trafficking around the world. Now is the time to act.”

The call has been for western intervention to help find the girls, and to help “stabilise” Nigeria in the aftermath of their kidnap. The British government has offered “practical help”.

Yet western intervention has time and again failed to deal with particular problems and – worse – has led to more deaths, displacements and atrocities than were originally faced. All too often it has been justified with reference to women’s rights, claiming that enlightened military forces can create an atmosphere where women are free from violence and abuse. The evidence is that the opposite is the case.

Women’s rights were a major justification for the Afghanistan war, launched in 2001, when Cherie Blair and Laura Bush supported their husbands’ war as a means of liberating Afghan women. Today, with millions displaced and tens of thousands dead, Afghanistan remains one of the worst countries on earth for women to live, with forced marriage, child marriage, rape and other atrocities still occurring widely.

Read More

(via disciplesofmalcolm)

May 9, 2014

dynamicafrica:

Xhosa Names & Meanings: The “ABC’s of Xhosa Names” by Thandiwe Tshabalala.

South African Illustrator and incredibly talented young creative Thandiwe Tshabalala recently sent me these awesome gifs highlighting and celebrating beautiful names in her mother tongue of Xhosa.

Here’s what she had to say about her series:

"Way back, when apartheid was taking place in South Africa, parents used to give their kids English names so that white people wouldn’t have to struggle pronouncing African names. Most people born during the times of apartheid were given names like: Knowledge, Margaret, Mavis (which has negative connotations), Innocentia, Innocent, Jeffrey, Gloria…eek..Let me just stop there. However, when black folks got their ‘freedom’ back, they went back to naming their children African/South African names."

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All Africa, All the time.

(via africaisdonesuffering)

May 4, 2014
Speaking of Boko Haram

atane:

Let us not forget that many of their victims are muslims. They have killed many clerics and imams who have called for peace. Most notably Imam Ibrahim Ahmed Abdullahi. Those kidnapped school girls are muslims. It goes far deeper than “Islamic fundamentalism” and their reign of…